Animal Relocation

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The ASPCA Relocation Program transports animals from shelters in areas of high homeless pet overpopulation (known as source shelters), to destination shelters, where there is a higher demand for adoptable animals. Relocation programs can be an important factor in ending the needless euthanasia of adoptable pets due to shelter overcrowding and lack of resources.

Effective relocation partnerships not only help the shelters in need reduce overcrowding, but also allows them to focus on development of best practices and new programs to improve animal welfare and save more lives in their communities.

Nancy Silverman Rescue Ride

animals in carriers for relocation

a transport truck

Lance from the ASPCA with a cat

The ASPCA’s relocation efforts provide resources, support and training to both source and destination shelters. The ASPCA Relocation Program strives to not only impact the number of animals housed at partner shelters, but also to help shelters create and strengthen programs that will have a long-term effect on animal welfare in the surrounding community.

Given the number of homeless pets in need, the ASPCA Relocation Program has expanded to include three transport routes across both coasts and through the Midwest.

Relocation Map

The West Coast Relocation Route
In 2014, the ASPCA launched the West Coast relocation route as part of the ASPCA’s commitment to helping at-risk animals in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Between 2014 and 2019, the L.A. program moved 51,490.

The Nancy Silverman Rescue Ride (NSRR)
Launched in January 2015, the ASPCA’s Nancy Silverman Rescue Ride (NSRR) initiative is aimed at relocating dogs from areas of high homeless pet overpopulation in the Southeast to locations in the Northeast. In 2019, the NSRR was responsible for the movement of 20,455 animals.

The Midwest Relocation Route
Launched in 2017, the Midwest route is the ASPCA’s newest animal relocation route. In its first three years, the ASPCA has moved 23,000 animals in the Midwest.