Tips for Being an Effective Online Advocate

Help animals with a click of your mouse! Thanks to technology, standing up for animals has never been easier. Learn to use your computer or mobile device to fight for strong, animal-friendly laws. You can download the following tips as a one-sheet PDF at the end of this page to print and distribute at events.

Your Legislators Are On Social Media & You Should Be, Too

Don’t be afraid to jump right in—setting up accounts on Facebook and Twitter is quick, easy and free! Be sure to follow your elected officials and important organizations like the ASPCA. Look for the blue checkmark next to the legislator’s name—that means it’s a verified account. Following the people and organizations relevant to the issues you care about will keep you informed and connected.

Don’t Be Shy: Reach Out to Media and Policymakers
Use social media to send messages directly to your legislators with the action you want them to take. Have a blog or press release? You can send it to members of the media and bloggers to try to gain coverage for the issue. And be sure to tweet and message organizations like the ASPCA to form partnerships with animal welfare organizations and causes.

Opt In for Targeted ASPCA Alerts
Sign up to receive ASPCA Advocacy Alerts for important email updates on what’s going on at your state capitol and how you can take action from your computer, your mobile device, or in person.

Connect with Like-Minded Advocates—Share, Share, Share
Share ASPCA Advocacy Alerts and encourage your network to take action, or use hashtags (#) and keywords that other animal advocates are using to create connections. This will make you part of a larger, unified voice for animals that can have an enormous effect on policy.

Email Your Legislators—And Make It Personal
Personalized emails are more likely to make your legislators sit up and take notice, so take the time to politely tell them why a particular bill or animal issue is important to you.  Strive to communicate as professionally as possible—just as you would in a face-to-face meeting—and don’t forget to be specific, cite facts, check your spelling and be polite! Find your legislators and how to contact them here.