March 22, 2016

ASPCA Forensic Veterinarian Receives 2016 Outstanding Service to Veterinary Medicine Award

We are pleased to share that Dr. Robert Reisman, Forensic Science Supervisor for the ASPCA’s Anti-Cruelty Group, recently received the 2016 Outstanding Service to Veterinary Medicine Award from the Veterinary Medical Association of New York. Dr. Reisman, who began working for the ASPCA in 1988, was recognized for his many contributions to veterinary medicine in New York State.

“The advancement of veterinary forensic sciences is essential to the fight against animal cruelty,” says Dr. Randall Lockwood, ASPCA Senior Vice President of Forensic Sciences and Anti-Cruelty Projects. “Dr. Reisman’s work in New York City and his ongoing research have advanced the application of veterinary medicine to the prosecution and prevention of violence against animals. His efforts throughout the years have given countless animal victims a voice.”

Dr. Robert Reisman (left) assists in a dog fighting rescue operation in 2013.
Dr. Robert Reisman (left) assists in a dog fighting rescue operation in 2013.

Dr. Reisman founded the ASPCA’s forensic sciences department and currently oversees forensic evaluations for animal cruelty victims in New York City. He has served as an expert trial witness in more than 60 cases nationwide, including the first animal cruelty cases in New York City to use DNA at trial to obtain felony convictions. He has contributed chapters to several texts, delivered lectures and presentations at veterinary conferences and has conducted numerous law enforcement trainings for the NYPD and Nassau County Police Department. Dr. Reisman has also served on the executive board of the Veterinary Medical Association of New York City for 10 years and is a founding member of the International Veterinary Forensic Sciences Association.

Dr. Reisman was instrumental in the expansion of the ASPCA’s forensic veterinary team to accommodate the influx of new cases that resulted from the launch of the organization’s partnership with the NYPD. In January 2014, the NYPD began took the lead role in responding to all animal cruelty complaints in the five boroughs, and the ASPCA began providing direct care support for the victims and conducting police training and forensic analysis. The partnership has broken records, with animal cruelty arrests and animals treated numbers increasing by nearly 200 percent in the first year.

Congratulations, Dr. Reisman, and thank you for your work!