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Demand More Vet Visits for Puppy Mill Dogs!

Tuesday, October 8, 2013 - 9:30am
muddy jack russell terrier

Just take a quick look at these distressing photos, and it’s obvious: Many puppy mill dogs clearly do not receive adequate veterinary care. The dogs in these photos are suffering from symptoms of grave neglect—emaciation, severe matting, advanced dental disease, eye and ear infections, skin diseases and mammary growths—that indicate a lack of regular, preventive veterinary care. This is especially true of adult breeding dogs, who typically are bred at every opportunity regardless of their health.

Why does this happen? Part of the problem is that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the enforcement agency for dog breeding requirements outlined in the Animal Welfare Act, recommends that facilities have veterinarians visit a minimum of once a year. An annual veterinary exam may be sufficient for a well-cared-for pet, but for dogs living in crowded, filthy enclosures and enduring frequent pregnancies—which vets consider a state of “accelerated starvation” because it is so physically taxing—annual vet visits are simply not enough.

Take Action!
The USDA is accepting comments on its veterinary care policy until Friday, October 11. Please tell the agency to revise its policy to recommend twice-a-year vet exams for animals, especially breeding animals. Submit your comments directly on this government webpage—we’ve provided talking points you may use (below), but your message will be more powerful if you tell the USDA how you feel in your own words.

 
The USDA’s Policy #3 on veterinary care falls short of common professional standards. The recommendation that veterinary visits occur “at least annually” is not sufficient to protect animals.
-Breeding dogs frequently suffer from emaciation, severe matting, advanced dental disease, eye and ear infection, skin diseases, and mammary growths that indicate a lack of regular, preventive care.
-Organizations including the Association of Shelter Veterinarians, the American Kennel Club, the American College of Theriogenologists and the Society for Theriogenology recommend semiannual veterinary exams and veterinary exams prior to breeding.
-Please revise Policy #3 to recommend a hands-on veterinary exam at least twice annually for all animals, particularly those bred more than once a year.

 
 

On behalf of the puppy mill dogs, thank you for your help.

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Sara Markham

Scientist have recently confirmed the emotional capabilities of these sweet and loving animals. They feel as much as we do, including the physical and emotional pain of the puppy mill process. Help them now.

Angela

We are currently fighting a 'puppy store' that is trying to come to a local mall, knowing full well that these dogs will be coming from mills. Due to the response, it's clear that we the people won't stand for this type of treatment of our beloved dogs. They all need to be shut down!

Donna D.

The USDA’s Policy #3 on veterinary care falls short of common professional standards. The recommendation that veterinary visits occur “at least annually” is not sufficient to protect animals.
-Breeding dogs frequently suffer from emaciation, severe matting, advanced dental disease, eye and ear infection, skin diseases, and mammary growths that indicate a lack of regular, preventive care.
-Organizations including the Association of Shelter Veterinarians, the American Kennel Club, the American College of Theriogenologists and the Society for Theriogenology recommend semiannual veterinary exams and veterinary exams prior to breeding.
-Please revise Policy #3 to recommend a hands-on veterinary exam at least twice annually for all animals, particularly those bred more than once a year.

Sarah B

A complete shame that this happens in a country like ours. FIX IT!

JoAnne

close the mills down! we have too many homeless and abused animals. when they are in loving homes, we could consider breeders. they are breeding these poor animals and living in dispicable conditions. no vet care and passing along issues on the babies they sell.

Kimberly A. Williams

The USDA’s Policy #3 on veterinary care falls short of common professional standards and should be revised to protect the animals.

Tara

Puppy mills are terrible to begin with, but if we can't shut them down these dogs should be treated more than once a year. This is just absurd and cruel.

Ashley Jones

Even twice a year seems far too infrequent considering the miserable living environment for these poor animals. As far as I'm concerned, puppy mills and backyard breeders alike should all be shut down or at the very least heavily regulated. Animal breeding is one of the few risk-free jobs available: heartless individuals can join the business whenever they like to make several hundred dollars a pup in profit. And even if their "product" doesn't sell, they have nothing to worry about. They aren't required to care for them. They can just take them to the local shelter and have them euthanized since the animal is no longer of any value to them. It's horrible that human beings have the rights to exploit animal breeding in such a cruel way with no concern regarding the affects on the over-population of our rescues. Animal neglect is virtually impossible to prove since the victim of the crime cannot speak for themselves. It makes me sick. But anything for an easy buck or two, right? God forbid these people actually go and get real jobs; ones that don't put other living beings into harms way.

Laura Parker

Puppy mills shouldn't even be allowed to be in operation, but since they are, they need much more stricter guidelines than what they currently have. A lot of these dogs are mistreated & underfed, not given any personal attention much less shown any love for the babies they keep reproducing for the owners. They need much more vet care for sure, two visits a year isn't asking for much, they need more, but certainly more than once a year... they are constantly at risk of all kinds of infections & their living conditions are often harsh & not safe. Please won't you hear our voice & help these helpless ones have better care if you are to keep them in pens, cages, etc for breeding purposes only. What a shame... shame on you for allowing it!

Chrissy Gallagan

These animals are not commodities, they are living beings, at our mercy, vulnerable and abused, innocent victims of human greed. Pls revise your veterinary care policy, these animals deserve better, we can do better.

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