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Join the Party! Celebrate Adopt a Shelter Dog Month

Monday, October 1, 2012 - 1:15pm
shelter dog

October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, and that means it’s time to celebrate all things canine and get more homeless pups into forever homes. To get the party started, we’ve prepared a special Adopt a Shelter Dog Month section on ASPCA.org devoted to the lovable shelter pooch.

Speaking of Pet Adoption…
Earlier this year, we polled hundreds of pup parents—some who adopted from shelters, and others who purchased their puppies at pet stores—about their experiences during and after acquiring their four-legged family members. You’d think that the pet store-pup parents, who got exactly the puppy they wanted, would be happier, but that’s not the case!

Our poll showed that people who adopted a dog from a shelter were much more likely to be pleased with their experience than those who purchased a puppy from a pet store. Shelter dog adopters are also almost twice as likely, compared to pet store customers, to feel that the process by which they got their dog was honest and transparent.

Here at the ASPCA, we’ve long been convinced that shelter dogs are awesome and that adoption is way better than buying a puppy from a pet store. Now we have the data to prove it!

“The ASPCA’s research confirms that adoption really is the best option when it comes to adding a new dog to your home,” says Cori Menkin, Senior Director of the ASPCA Puppy Mills Campaign. “Most pet store puppies come from puppy mills, and we continue to urge those who are looking for a new companion to adopt a dog from a shelter instead of buying a puppy from a pet store. By doing so, you’re not only giving a shelter pup a new chance at life, but you’re also helping fight puppy mill cruelty.”

“And once you do adopt,” adds Menkin, “be sure not to buy any of your new pets’ supplies at pet stores that sell puppies!” Take the No Pet Store Puppies Pledge today.

Get Involved
There are tons of ways to get involved this October, ranging from sending a single tweet to volunteering at your local shelter. Head over to ASPCA.org to read all about it, and remember—there are millions of wonderful, adorable dogs in our country who need homes, so please opt to adopt!

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Emily ZR

Won't mince words - my little one was just a little bit better than damaged goods psychologically when I got him 7 years ago from a small-dog rescue group. It took tons of patience, understanding, love and mutual respect to get him to where he is today. My Benjie is not perfect, but life with him has been such a joy!

Louise Volpe

My dogs came from high-kill shelters in Kentucky. One is a Black Lab Golden Retriever mix, the other is a Black Lab Pointer Mix.
They are great dogs. We owned a Lab that was sick and had to put to sleep since he couldn't walk any longer. We decided to adopt a dog from a shelter.

Kathy

After 10 years, I have 2 shelter dogs raised from puppies. My dogs are the most lovable and protective family members. All they want is LOVE. My 2 babies are a chocolate lab and a german shepherd. Adopting from shelters are the only way to go!!!!!!! People without shelter pets will never fill the void in their heart.

Cindy

The love of my life is four legged and has fur! She was a private adoption/rescue from a high school senior that knew she could not take care of her dog while attending college. She did not want to drop the dog off at a shelter for fear it would be euthenized. I am very grateful that this girl was responsible and actively found a new loving home. My dog is my child with fur!

Cyndi

We are against buying pets from pet stores. But our dog comes from one. We RESCUED her. Ten years ago I went into an unfamiliar affluent suburban pet store to get supplies. I had no idea they sold dogs. If I had known, I would never have gone in there. When I entered I saw a 4 month old border Collie pup sitting in a cage. If you know border collies, then you know they have no business being sold to busy, upper middle class families with tiny backyards and no time to properly train and exercise them. I knew she was going to be adopted, then dumped at the local animal shelter after a few months when she was just too much for the family. She may have even bitten one of the kids....you know border collies and little kids. Since my husband and I are experienced border collie parents, we rescued her. We even got "papers" on her. And these clearly lead back to a puppy mill! Penny is a wonderful girl. But she came with all kinds of problems. We spent months training her properly. She was one of the hardest dogs we've ever had to train. She has many quirks. But she is sweet and smart, and we love her to death!

adopter

I am a huge adoption supporter. I have 2 big mixed breeds right now that were found as strays. However I will say the adoption process is also not for everyone and there are responsible breeders out there who support their individual breeds. To the people who want a purebred puppy pleeeeeease seek out a responsible breeder. No good breeder would ever sell their pups in a pet store, no matter what the shop owner tells you.

Teri

Over the last 27 years my husband and I have had probably 10 dogs...and not one came from a pet store. A couple were given to us, a couple we bought from the paper and the rest were either rescue or shelter dogs. I have had dogs all my life, can't imagine life without one. And knowing that they are shelter dogs just makes it that much better!

colleen

Three of my 4 dogs were someone else's "throw aways." The first was a young pit/boxer pup that was abandoned on a cold winter night. The second, a pit/pit bull mix, I adopted from a kill shelter shortly before she was to have been euthanized. The third, a pit bull, was a stray I adopted after she was almost hit by a car. They're ALL outstanding, loving and loyal...but that little girl spared from euthanasia at the shelter has become my "heart/velcro" dog and the bond we share is truly exceptional.

colleen

Three of my 4 dogs were someone else's "throw aways." The first was a young pit/boxer pup that was abandoned on a cold winter night. The second, a pit/pit bull mix, I adopted from a kill shelter shortly before she was to have been euthanized. The third, a pit bull, was a stray I adopted after she was almost hit by a car. They're ALL outstanding, loving and loyal...but that little girl spared from euthanasia at the shelter has become my "heart/velcro" dog and the bond we share is truly exceptional.

just me

I have 2 pugs one from a pet store we got as a pup and one from a shelter both are very differant in personality and we love them both equally ,my rescue pug was a stray when the humane society found him. I dont know what his background is or how long he lived on the streets but it took us over a year for him not to really trust us . He would always want to be under the covers , he would get scared when someone would come in the room to quickly or had slamed the door to loud , he was sensitive to what was on T.V . I was real worried he wouldnt come around his first instinct was to bite us when he was scared , but finally he has relaxed and has realized he is safeand now no more covers for him and even has a prance in his step it has been very rewarding to help him , I would do it again for sure , I was able to hang in there with him because my kids were 11 and 13 so old enough to be aware of their movements so they knew not to run up on him and to be more carefull but beleive me he did bite a few times not enough to do major damage but a bite is a bite so it was alot of work but Im so glad he worked out he really is a cool and unique liitle guy

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