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USDA to Regulate Internet Puppy Breeders!

Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:15pm

Have you heard the news? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is finally planning to crack down on Internet puppy sales! Why, you ask? Well, believe it or not, buying a puppy online is just as bad as buying one from a pet shop—maybe even worse!

Currently, the federal Animal Welfare Act—passed 40 years ago, before the Internet even existed—only requires breeders who sell dogs to pet stores or to puppy brokers to be licensed and inspected by the USDA. The USDA has just released proposed regulatory language to close this loophole.

Don’t Be Fooled!
Many puppies sold online come from puppy mills. Most websites that sell puppies online claim to be good dog breeders—they even use fancy terms like “certified kennel”, “AKC-registered”, “pedigree” and “health certified,” and include photos of cute puppies frolicking in ideal settings. The truth is that many of these breeders are really puppy mills in disguise. Trust us, no truly responsible breeder would ever sell their dogs online and have them shipped to your doorstep.

Help the ASPCA fight this horrible industry and sign our puppy mill pledge today!

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Casey

What point are you people trying to make here? The fact is that the majority of "breeders" who sell dogs online are puppy mills. Maybe not all of them, but if I feel that there is even a slight chance of supporting these disgusting people, I won't take that chance. There are plenty of local shelters, purebred rescues and breeders to choose from.

Linda Morgan

Wheww! Come on people this is not to be debated about. A lot of people do not seem to realize that this is really big big bucks to these breeders! I saw an undercover tape of a dog auction. Do you think they are treated well? No, they are in hell! They go to the highest bidder or are killed! No food or water all day. Hundreds of them! Horrible people who throw them around like their garbage! Saw another one where these Amish man took the "new employee" way behind the other buildings on the property and told her "don't ever let the public ever see this." Whole room was bars and cages. It even had covers so the dogs could not stand to see out. I saw a handsome English Bulldog in a cage so small he could only stand there! Did you ever hear dogs moan? I did. Made me cry. He said to her "do you really let these animals in your homes?" He was appalled. When he went to court for some reason nothing was done. Something is wrong here too!

Emma Lee

This is great! We got my puppy from a shelter, and she's really cute!

MARIA RUETTIGER

I BOUGHT MY 2 PUPPIES FROM A BREEDER ON LONIE AND THEY WERE VERY NICE PEOPLE AND I MADE IT A POINT TO GO OUT TO THE BREEDER TO SEE IF IT WAS INDEED A PUPPY MILLL AND FOUND OUT THAT THEY WERE NOT,,,YES WERE NOT A PUPPY MILL!!! I REFUSED TO HAVE THEM FLOWN OUT TO ME!! SO I KNEW FOR SURE THAT MY BREEDER WAS NOT A PUPPY MILL!!! SO I WISH YOU WOULD NOT STEROTYPE ALL OF THEM ,,THIS IS NOT ALWAYS TRUE!!! THERE ARE SOME OF US THAT ARE NOT PUPPY MILLS!!!

DR. HOWARD HAIL

Show breeders are not responsible for the dogs in shelters. These dogs are produced by wild feral dogs that are allowed to run free in poor neighborhoods. Show breeders do not breed hundreds of puppies a year and its time everyone realized that purpose bred dogs do serve a purpose in society. Each breed has a job to do and finding one that fits your lifestyle is the first step in ensuring that you won't be contributing to the shelter problem. These people who chastise everyone for not buying a shelter dog do not realize that all shelter dogs do not work well with all families. Studies show that 47% of all shelter dogs will be returned to the shelter for the same behaviors and disease costs that got them put there in the first place. If you focused on just buying from reputable breeders and not factory farmed puppies we could end this issue here and now. You who push shelter dogs and demean well breed and well raised dogs are a big part of the problem. How? because you continue to feed the puppy mills by buying and yes, I said buying rescue dogs to take to those areas that have no dogs. If no one bought any dog except from a qualified show breeder then there would be no problem because there would be no market for the poorly bred dogs. But by guilting everyone into buying a shelter dog you contribute to the pipe line and need for such animals. Follow the market. And if you cannot find a responsible breeder in your area just check the breed clubs. DID you know that AKC show breeders cannot sell to pet shops. I am so tired of this hate speech as it does nothing to solve the problem it just makes small minded people seem superior. Well you are the biggest part of the problem because only show breeders teach new owners how to care for their dogs. Shelters don't otherwise they would not have such a large return rate. All this hate is coming from the very people who keep the problem going by pushing people to buy shelter dogs thinking this will end the market, But instead you have created a bigger market demand for rescue dogs as everyone wants to be known as a rescue savior.

Dr. HOWARD HAIL

By the way I would not want a puppy raised under the USDA guidelines because those rules are dangerous to the health and welfare of that puppy. Puppies need special stimulation to make good companions. Studies show that home raised puppies using neurological sensory exercises will make for a better, more trainable and health puppy later in life. Any dog that is isolated in the manner the USDA requires will wind up unable to learn and stressed out all the time because they do not have the skills or knowledge necessary to live in a home situation. Those of you who advocate for this rule change should be ashamed of yourselves for forcing dogs to live at the barest minimum contact with human beings, other animals, and without access to their own family members. Did you know the USDA requires puppies to be separated from their own family members as soon as they are weaned. They can even play with other puppies. What happens to the singleton pup who has no siblings in a USDA building? He has to spend his most formative time for brain development alone in a box. You people call yourself animal lovers! How could you want these animals taken from the best homes and put in an industrial box with minimal care. Get real folks this is about ending all purebred dogs because the do well as companion animals and the animal rights people are out to end pet owner ship in this country.

Myra

Well said!!!!! You've got it 100% right! This isn't about puppy mild it's about animal rights activists trying to get between honest American breeders and their dogs. Bad Bad Bad move on the part of USDA and ASPCA!!

Myra

Hi. First off most of you that so fiercely diss the puppy mills really know very little about the subject and even less about ethical breeders. There are Many ethical, honest people out there who breed dogs - and use the internet to sell them. I bought a Siberian Husky show puppy early this year. Her breeder was Very concerned about who I was, if I was going to treat her baby ok, where the puppy would live, would I train and show her, what she would eat, etc etc etc. The puppy came with all current vaccination, a health guarantee, lifetime breeder support, and a contract. If I violate the contract I pay big time. There are ways to spot a puppy mill. You have to do your research. I don't mean googleing puppy mill and saying, "oh my Goodness! All Internet sale of animals has to quit!!!" that's like saying that every store that sells stuff on the internet is a fraud. We all know that isn't true and most of us know how to spot a good one and how to pick out the ones to stay away from. The fact of the matter is that this rule really won't even affect the puppy mills but it Will put the best breeders out of business. If you treat your dogs right, research animals health, feed the best food you can possibly afford, you don't make much if Any money on dogs. With all the new licensing fees it'll be almost impossible.
Sure you can always go rescue a dog or cat but you and you may end up with a good one - or Not. I plan to show and breed Siberian Huskies. You could rescue a Siberian from a shelter, he'll be over vaccinated, you don't know what kind of training or socializing history he has, most likely there will be behavioral issues etc. Or you could do your research, communicate with a breeder online and over the phone, find one you know is ethical, and buy a happy healthy puppy with proper socialization, good temperament, a health guarantee, parents have health clearances (tested for HD and CERF tested and any other testing that is specific to the breed of dog your buying. Do you even know which health issues are specific to the breed you fancy??

MOST IMPORTANT, IF EVERYONE WAS A RESPONSIBLE ANIMAL OWNER AND DID THERE RESEARCH PUPPY MILLS AND SHELTERS WOULDN'T EVEN EXIST!!!!!!!! Think about that.

lablady

I am a breeder and I do ofa hips, elbows, hearts and eye clearances before breeding my dogs. My buyers are always welcome to visit and come pick up their puppies and meet my adults. Huge difference between good breeders and puppy mills. My dogs have large fenced in areas to run, concrete kennel runs and a puppy house that is heated and air conditioned. They get the best food and vet care when needed. My dogs are happy and healthy. I keep between 6 - 8 adults at a time. All the breeders I know are just like me. There are good breeders out there.

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