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The Importance of Being Neutered

Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 9:15am
curious looking black and tan puppy

Whether you’ve recently adopted a dog or you’re considering it, one of the most important health decisions you’ll make is whether to spay or neuter your new pet.

When it comes to “fixing” male dogs, specifically, there’s a lot of misinformation swirling around. (“It’ll make my dog fat” and “it’ll change his personality” are two common myths that we’d like to bust forever!) Some pet parents even express guilt over neutering their dogs. But trust us, he doesn’t mind, and here’s why:

Neutering provides major health benefits.
Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male pup prevents testicular cancer and significantly reduces the chance of certain prostate problems as he ages.

Your neutered male will be more at peace.
Neutering won’t affect your dog’s working abilities, friendliness or playfulness! However, it will likely reduce undesirable, sometimes dangerous behaviors including urine marking, attempts to roam away from home, aggression toward other dogs and inappropriate mounting. These things stress everybody out—including him.

He won’t become a deadbeat dad.
Every year, millions of dogs of all ages and breeds are euthanized or suffer as strays. You wouldn’t want your beloved pooch to be responsible for creating yet another unplanned litter, would you?

Many states and counties have established safe, low-cost spay/neuter programs that make surgery easily affordable and accessible. To find an affordable program near you, search our Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Provider Database. If you're in New York City, the ASPCA mobile spay/neuter clinic offers partially or fully subsidized spay/neuter surgery for low-income dog and cat owners in the five boroughs.

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georgieboy

Are you insane? Why would you sign something like that?

Amy

My Westie is neutered. I'm happy to reduce his risk of prostate problems and eliminate the threat of testicular cancer. However, he urinates in our laundry room, just inside the flap in the door to his very own run. Sometimes he defecates there too. I'm actually sympathetic when it's raining, but that isn't always the deciding factor. He marks spots many times when we're out for a walk. He regularly humps his large ball that has holes in it (called a Holey Roller by the manufacturer). We find that last one amusing. I don't even care if he marks spots on a walk. The indoor urination is an ongoing problem. He also runs away to tour the neighborhood if he's not on a leash -- can't take him down to the mailbox without one. Neutering is still a good idea, in my opinion, but it's not all it's cracked up to be.

Libby

I am a dyed in the wool "neuterer." I spay/neuter at 6 months, without fail. I usually make the appointment during the first "meet and greet" with my vet and star it on my calendar. No litters at my house; I consider it part of being a responsible owner. I know enough about breeding to know that I don't know enough to breed responsibly, so I choose not to breed at all.

Jannie

Spaying my dog is the best thing I could have ever done!!! I had heard the same, that spayed dogs gain weight etc etc... but it isn't true. I did my homework before spaying her though, and found out that spayed dogs sometimes need LESS food than they might have gotten before. Not sure I remember the reason for that, but yeah. Something about how when certain hormones are removed it slows down their metabolism or something. I had her spayed at 7 months, I have always been strict with feeding her twice a day with the amounts suggested on the back of the kibble bag, and to be honest... she is much slimmer now than she used to be. I obviously exercise her properly as well.

If you spay (or neuter) your dog, it will NOT get fat, as long as you take proper care of it. Make sure you don't over-feed it, and exercise your pup! Saying that your dog got fat from bein neutered or spayed just means that you've been slacking when it comes to taking proper care of your dog.

My dog did not have any behavior changes, and she is the happiest dog in the world. Her favorite thing is to play with other dogs, and thanks to her being spayed she has never had to worry about being in heat or anything, which would have prevented her from playing with her best friends.

Spay and neuter your dogs... do them the favor.

Carol

We are on our 2nd neutered male, both still did/do unwanted mounting.

Joe Mama

Irresponsible pet owners don't neuter their dogs because they need it to be their penis extension. Their dog need to be virile, aggressive, intimidating to make themselves feel better. They care nothing for anyone but themselves. Antisocial idiots. Pathetic.

rachel schwartz

It's totally absurd to say that neutering is "good" for the dog.You might as well say that humans should be neutered because it's good for them...no unwanted kids...no testicular cancer as well as reducing prostate problems.
I had a Rottie which I did not neuter until I had to for medical reasons. He was 10 at that time. He was never alone or out of someone's sight and so, we never feared that he would impregnate another dog.
Don't lie to people...tell them the truth...it'll go a whole lot farther!!!!

rachel schwartz

It's totally absurd to say that neutering is "good" for the dog.You might as well say that humans should be neutered because it's good for them...no unwanted kids...no testicular cancer as well as reducing prostate problems.
I had a Rottie which I did not neuter until I had to for medical reasons. He was 10 at that time. He was never alone or out of someone's sight and so, we never feared that he would impregnate another dog.
Don't lie to people...tell them the truth...it'll go a whole lot farther!!!!

Mary

It's just plain irresponsible not to spay/neuter your pets. I can't believe some of the excuses. Most of the problems that you whiners cite are YOUR fault, not the dog. Irresponsible dog owners are why the shelters are full and so many dogs and cats are being killed.

Rebecca

I have a intact male who cant be neutered due to a health issue he was born with and he doesn't do any of the things I'm often told he'll do because he still has a pair.
He doesn't hump, doesn't wander, listens to me amazingly, he's met females in heat and didn't even look at them twice, he's not aggressive unless he thinks his pack is in danger.
I just wanna put it out there that not all intact dogs are going to do these things.
The health benefits are there (even if they seem small) but not every dog can be neutered. So next time you see a intact male dont jump to the conclusion the person is ignorant or keeping them intact for ego reasons. Sometimes dogs are allergic to the gas or they have some sort of other issue that prevents it.

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