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Help Us Choose the 2015 Calendar Cover Pet!

Tuesday, July 1, 2014 - 1:00pm
Help Us Choose the 2015 Calendar Cover Pet!

It’s no secret that ASPCA employees are crazy about animals, so why should our own pets be any exception? Every year, we create a beautiful wall calendar for our friends and supporters using our very own furry friends as models, and as you can imagine, the competition is pretty fierce!

Our 2015 calendar is almost complete, but there’s still one very important decision to make: Whose adorable adopted companion should grace this year’s cover?

We’ve narrowed it down to four contenders, and we need YOU to help us choose a winner. Check out the photos that are in the running, read a little about these sweet, adopted animals, and then cast your vote for our 2015 Cover Dog or Cat. The pet whose photo gets the most votes will have his or her face in homes all across America!

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Lori Cotter

I do understand and agree with what you're saying with your story, however I've known some cocker spaniels and poodles who did the same thing. They were "cute" so were not put down or taken away. I think it's just ignorance with an outside chance that there may be a flawed gene somewhere in the pit's background - along with the other two!

Deborah

But it could have been about breeding. Just like any other pure bred animal, the qualities it was bred for are as important as their life experience. Those dogs that come from a line of fighting dogs may never make good house pets. If they are carefully bred to promote lines that are less aggressive, they will be less agressive. or not aggressive at all. My niece has a wonderful old girl she got as a puppy. She is as loving an animal as I have ever met. I only see her every few years and yet she remembers me and we have no trouble bonding each time. She has never, ever threatened to bite or bitten anyone and that includes small children who were probably driving her nuts. There is a new puppy in the house and she is loving the heck out of it, even though she is quite old, half blind and a bit wobbly on her feet. It is unfair to characterize a breed because of a bad experience. So many of these dogs (you never hear about them because they don't do anything wrong) are as sweet as can be. I'm sorry it didn't work out for you, but they are no more dangerous than a rotweiller or doberman or german shepherd.

Deborah

But it could have been about breeding. Just like any other pure bred animal, the qualities it was bred for are as important as their life experience. Those dogs that come from a line of fighting dogs may never make good house pets. If they are carefully bred to promote lines that are less aggressive, they will be less agressive. or not aggressive at all. My niece has a wonderful old girl she got as a puppy. She is as loving an animal as I have ever met. I only see her every few years and yet she remembers me and we have no trouble bonding each time. She has never, ever threatened to bite or bitten anyone and that includes small children who were probably driving her nuts. There is a new puppy in the house and she is loving the heck out of it, even though she is quite old, half blind and a bit wobbly on her feet. It is unfair to characterize a breed because of a bad experience. So many of these dogs (you never hear about them because they don't do anything wrong) are as sweet as can be. I'm sorry it didn't work out for you, but they are no more dangerous than a rotweiller or doberman or german shepherd.

Pam

So sorry to hear that. You loved her and raised her well.

Sheila

We do all the right things to try to raise our children properly also, but sadly sometimes they mess up badly in spite of us. That doesn't mean we stop loving them. Same with our babies that are our pets.

Jay

The owner makes the dog what they are!

Barbara

So sorry it for your sad ending with your baby.

But it's not just pitties that can be over-protective. I took my mother's dog in three years ago because she could no longer care for her. She hated everyone who wasn't family. She just started allowing my husband to pet her, and she is a great watch dog. Luckily, she is a 10 lb. toy poodle and easy for me to control. Some dogs are, unfortunately, just like that. On the other hand, my nephew has a female pit who only wants belly rubs. So go figure!

Ellen

I have the same problem Linda. My part pit- part Lab wants to get at other animals outside the fence. She loves people, but occasionally she will bark and snarl at a particular someone just walking by the house. I keep a strict eye on her at all times when she is outside, even though she is in a fenced in yard. Scolding her does not help. If I can not keep an eye on her she has to come into the house. She is a great dog! However there is just something inside of her that makes her aggressive. I'd rather keep her in the house than have a tragedy happen, where they would take her away. She is the most loving, playful, happy dog that I have ever had. She is spoiled rotten. Yet she insists on being aggressive out in the yard.

Mary

My dog is the same way -- we love her but she cannot be trusted around new people (sometimes even people she knows). But she is not a pit bull, she is a dachshund mix. I don't think it's the breed. It's the personality.

Becky

I understand what your saying, but do you believe it was just because she was a pit? I would hope not. Sometimes the sweetest family pets are protective, especially rescues who are in loving homes, can be protective enough to bite. I dated a guy whose family owned a chow. She never bit me but she came close and growled everytime I came over, or anyone who she didn't know, came around his family. As I said in my previous post, all animals, even those who have been domesticated, like dogs, have a primal instinct that is sometimes stronger in some dogs than others, but it's not always a particular breed. I own a pit and have owned a few before this one (all were rescues) who NEVER gave me a problem. The first one I owned was the sweetest baby and he was an outside dog (we live out in the country), but we temporarily moved and had to put him on a runner. The only people he barked at or showed aggression to were my cousins who aggravated him. (Both grown men). I appreciate that you take in rescues and applaud that you haven't given up. I also said that it's about the individual dog and not the breed. She just had a stronger instinct to protect you, her family. There are always different circumstances and reasons people have for disliking a breed and that's their right, but I don't think it's fair to condemn the whole breed. Sorry you lost "Baby". I know how much they become a part of your family.

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