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Help Us Choose the 2015 Calendar Cover Pet!

Tuesday, July 1, 2014 - 1:00pm
Help Us Choose the 2015 Calendar Cover Pet!

It’s no secret that ASPCA employees are crazy about animals, so why should our own pets be any exception? Every year, we create a beautiful wall calendar for our friends and supporters using our very own furry friends as models, and as you can imagine, the competition is pretty fierce!

Our 2015 calendar is almost complete, but there’s still one very important decision to make: Whose adorable adopted companion should grace this year’s cover?

We’ve narrowed it down to four contenders, and we need YOU to help us choose a winner. Check out the photos that are in the running, read a little about these sweet, adopted animals, and then cast your vote for our 2015 Cover Dog or Cat. The pet whose photo gets the most votes will have his or her face in homes all across America!

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norma77760@hotm...

I agree with your point of view.

Robert Negron

all breeds are protective of there family by nature good socialization at a young age is key

Lynn

I have read such sad stories as yours also. Pits raised in loving families who then inexplicably go on to harm and even kill a child or passerby, when no one would believe that the dog was remotely capable of such an act. These events happen and cost lives. This cannot be denied by the best intentions of dog lovers. It is not worth even one life.

Teri

With as many Pit Bulls running the street, there is a greater chance you can get one that is not inbred and will be healthy.
Dogs don't come with guarantees; but a dog that has been bred carefully has a better chance of being normal and healthy.
I had a Cocker Spaniel named Bucky, the love of my life. Sadly, Bucky suffered from seizures and rage disorder. If you are unfamiliar with rage disorder, it's frightening. It is a neurological condition caused by poor breeding. My sweet dog would go from relaxed and loving to KUJO. And I don't think he could control it. I saw him in attack mode nearly every time I introduced someone new. The problem was worse when people would not believe me; they would see my adorable Bucky and want to hug and play before he knew them.
It's easier to train a dog than to train a person.
If you are unsure of a dog; ignore it! If you go on regular walks keep treats with you and drop one on the ground if the dog is coming your direction. Don't engage in play, just leave the treat, if the dog follows you, drop another. Eventually the dog will get bored with the game. But will remember you next time you walk by.

Audrey Barberi

Unfortunately, it is the people who want "guard" or mean dogs that pick pit bulls. They may have been made mean by the humans who owned them, but they are STILL mean and were bred that way clear back in the 1800's. And there have been too many incidents of pits and a couple other breeds who just suddenly turn on their own families. there are other breeds. Pick a "family" dog.

Lola

Linda is right...some breeds are just bred to be super protective...it is NOT their fault, but it is a fact. Pits are not good family pets - not because they can't be loveable, but because they are too dedicated to their families....so sad....

belle

Not all pit bulls are as you describe. I personally know one from whom the biggest threat is her slobbering on you. She thinks she is a lap dog. On the other hand, when I was a kid my aunt had a miniature poodle that was one reason I was scared to death of dogs for years.

Clare

We have the same situation and that is our only option if we can no longer take our "baby" out on a leash. It is sad he cannot go romp in the yard or run free in our fenced yard but he is content to do his business and come back in with us. He has a wonderful family and gets along with our other rescues (they were here first so they are family) but no one else or no other animal is welcome and we Know he is capable of doing harm so take extreme caution to assure that doesn't happen. I think the terrible extensive breeding and generations of it affect some of these lovable loyal dogs to the extent when irresponsible owners do what irresponsible owners do the whole breed gets a bad rap. I know that when and if we aren't able to protect our "baby" from himself we will have to put him down too. With children in the house it would have been sooner rather than later because that is too much responsibility to put on a child, but it is adults here who love all animals. Thanks for sharing, Linda. I just wanted you to know your comments rang so true. He is hellbent on protecting us from anything or anyone, but very happy and a big old baby who is scared of the washing machine on spin cycle and tries to hide behind us.

Clare

We have the same situation and that is our only option if we can no longer take our "baby" out on a leash. It is sad he cannot go romp in the yard or run free in our fenced yard but he is content to do his business and come back in with us. He has a wonderful family and gets along with our other rescues (they were here first so they are family) but no one else or no other animal is welcome and we Know he is capable of doing harm so take extreme caution to assure that doesn't happen. I think the terrible extensive breeding and generations of it affect some of these lovable loyal dogs to the extent when irresponsible owners do what irresponsible owners do the whole breed gets a bad rap. I know that when and if we aren't able to protect our "baby" from himself we will have to put him down too. With children in the house it would have been sooner rather than later because that is too much responsibility to put on a child, but it is adults here who love all animals. Thanks for sharing, Linda. I just wanted you to know your comments rang so true. He is hellbent on protecting us from anything or anyone, but very happy and a big old baby who is scared of the washing machine on spin cycle and tries to hide behind us.

Wright Gres

Hi Linda.
I wouldn't think of contradicting you regarding your experience. However, I would like to add a thought:
We adopt dogs -- somehow they just seem to end up at our home (We currently have six, and we're lucky that we now live kind of out in the country). I believe your Baby might have "just been one of those dogs" that bite. My brother had a dog -- not a Pit -- that was loved, never abused, but simply bit people. He would be happy, friendly, then, without notice or any observable reason, would slip around behind a person and bite the back of that person's leg.
One of our current dogs is a Jack Russel and gets along with all of us, though, admittedly, she's still a Jack Russel and bossy and self-centered. However, we once adopted one of that breed and we never could get her to accept any other dog. We had to find a new home for that one, a home where that dog was an only child.
My point is that it just may be that Baby was just one of those dogs -- and perhaps it had nothing to do with being a Pit.
Best wishes to you and your family -- people and dogs.

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