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Dognapping On the Rise—Protect Your Pet

Thursday, August 2, 2012 - 11:15am
terrier

Pet theft is on the rise. The American Kennel Club, which has been tracking pet thefts since 2007, reported a 32% increase in dog thefts last year.

While some animals are snatched from their yards or during home invasions, opportunistic thieves most commonly steal dogs left in cars or tied up outside stores. In the ASPCA’s hometown of New York City, dognappings skyrocket every summer as pet parents take advantage of nice weather to combine dog-walking with errand-running.

Protect Your Pet
Avoid becoming a victim of this heartbreaking crime!

  • When running errands around town, visit pet-friendly establishments or please leave your dog at home.
  • Keep a close eye on your pet in designated off-leash areas, where he could become a target for criminals looking to make a quick buck. (Pet thieves often try to resell—or even hold for ransom—stolen dogs.)
  • Avoid leaving your pet unattended in the front yard, especially if your lawn is exposed or accessible.
  • The same rules apply for leaving your pet tied up outside a store. In addition to being vulnerable to theft and teasing, your dog might escape or get injured.
  • Microchip your pet! Microchipping can often mean the difference between temporary and permanent separation from your furry loved one.

For more important information about what to do if your pet is missing, please read our article on Finding a Lost Pet.

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puck

She didn't say A/C didn't care. The reason they don't show up doesn't matter. If the dog looks like it's about to die you have to get it out of the car. You may have to pay for the window but it's worth it if it saves the dogs life. The owner may thank you.

anthony

I agree as long as you sre prepared to pay for the window, or door,compensate the owner for any lost time from work to fix the window, pay a fine or serve jail time for theft of personal property (which legally it is)sorry i hate it to but its the truth.

Sheri Skinner

https://www.facebook.com/JusticeForTheo
From the Facebook page above:
A forum for ideas to make sure Theo's owners are never allowed to do this again..they lived inside in the air conditioning and even swam in their pool as Theo suffered alone, tethered and without water - multiple calls were made to Animal Control but no action was taken - we do not advocate any vigilantism, merely the proper legal channels to ensure legal prosecution. We need help making sure Theo's owners are prosecuted for his horrific death and demand a full investigation into Knoxville Animal Control.

Sheri Skinner

https://www.facebook.com/JusticeForTheo
From the Facebook page above:
A forum for ideas to make sure Theo's owners are never allowed to do this again..they lived inside in the air conditioning and even swam in their pool as Theo suffered alone, tethered and without water - multiple calls were made to Animal Control but no action was taken - we do not advocate any vigilantism, merely the proper legal channels to ensure legal prosecution. We need help making sure Theo's owners are prosecuted for his horrific death and demand a full investigation into Knoxville Animal Control.

Susanne

Just signed the petition. In our middleclass neighborhood in Gainesville, Florida, (hopefully the situation has changed) we also called A/C and got no response except that they would "investigate". Meanwhile, three dogs died, one of untreated mange, one of starvation, and one in a tiny little dog enclosure. Another redbone hound was tied up permanently on a three foot chain, often in 95 degree heat without water; and because we complained, the owners "disappeared" him. So whatever the reason, for people to say that theft is always theft is to be naive about the cruelty of people. One responder did the right thing and brought the dog to the vet after rescuing a dog getting heatstroke (twice, bravo!) and then called the police. In both cases, the owner of the dog was fined, and not the rescuer. I saw a similar situation on a road with a chow and luckily it was a nurse who happened upon the scene and was able to take immediate and proper emergency measures or the dog would have been very dead. The owner was clueless and just thought the dog had fainted and would soon wake up. Another problem with overheated dogs is brain damage. Death is not always the only possible result from being left in hot situations. As has been pointed out: dogs have fur. Moreover, they cannot sweat except thru their paws, but can only get some heat removed by respiring rapidly and by panting. So not only should you sit in a rapidly warming car in a fur coat, but you should also have a way of preventing transpiration/sweating, if you want to compare an experience of a dog in a potentially very dangerous situation. So, by all means, err on the side of helping the animal and sort out the social niceties afterwards. These attacks on "activists" are like comparing stealing a sofa with getting an animal out of distress. Obviously, the key word is distress. Panting, sides going like bellows, pacing — or worse, an inert form.

Jennie

I have two dogs who I of course think are just wonderful. Toby is a 4 year old chow/lab mix. I "found" him as a stray who was roaming my neighborhood. He looked so lost and sad. I lured him in with some kibble and have never been sorry for it. His comrade Maddy is a 15 year old chow/shepherd mix. I have a fenced yard and they are always in it when they are out. They are great companions and they even like the cats.

jim

i take my dog with me just about every day. he's a large german shepherd but very friendly, so he'd be an easy mark for a thief. when he's in the car, all four windows are rolled halfway down, plus i keep him on a leash threaded through the seatbelt attachment. i also keep the car locked so the alarm would sound if anyone attempted to open the door. The best, and safest advice is to keep your dog at home, but if you, like me, have your pet with you, some of these precautions can be useful

lab-lover4life

I do the same for my 80 lb lab. Sometimes I'll even leave him a bowl of water in the back seat even though I know I'm not going to be more than 5 minutes. My dog goes everywhere with me too - work, the store, etc.

Tracey Sandilands

The worst is, sometimes dogs - especially little ones - are sold to dog fighting rings to be used as bait, or to unscrupulous laboratories for testing purposes. There are fates worse than being resold. Never leave your dog unattended anywhere outside your locked home!

Melody

I rescued my dog from a shelter and loved her from the moment I saw her. She is my baby and I love her so very much. One day she was in the backyard fenced in with a locked gate, and I went on an errand and left her in the backyard thinking she would be safe. When I got home she was no where to be found. I looked for her everyday, I never gave up. One day I was looking on the internet in a local paper and noticed an ad that said someone found a dog with a tatoo on her tummy. (the tatoo was on her tummy when I rescued her to show that she was spayed), anyhow I called this person right away and asked her a few questions about my dog to make sure that it was her and when I realized it was her I asked if it was to late to go and get her. The person said no come and get her. I was so excited. When I got to the location the person that found her let her out of the house. When my dog realized it was me, she ran as fast as she could. I called her name and the person said that her children wanted to keep her, but that wasn't about to happen when I was looking for her a week. Since then I never left her outside again when I go somewhere. She is locked up in the house. I never want to go through that again. By the way she is happy and spoiled.

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